Tag Archive for: James Bradley

 

A vast journey spanning the breadth, depths, past, present and future of the oceans from their evolution and science, to their exploration and exploitation. Woven through with mystery, wisdom and wonder, Deep Water explores humankind’s complex relationship with the oceans along with an uncompromising view of the environmental catastrophe unfolding, but it is also suffused with the glories of the ocean and alert to the extraordinary efforts of the scientists and researchers whose work helps us understand its secrets. Immense in scope but also profoundly personal, it offers vital new ways of understanding humanity’s place on our planet, and shows how the oceans might yet save us all. Compassionate and urgent, Bradley’s vivid writing brings the oceans alive and reminds us of what we are at risk of losing.

Clade is the story of one family in a radically changing world, a place of loss and wonder where the extraordinary mingles with the everyday. Haunting, lyrical and unexpectedly hopeful, it is the work of a writer in command of the major themes of our time. The distinguished nature writer Robert Macfarlane calls it “a brilliant, unsettling and timely novel: a true text of the Anthropocene in its subtle shuttlings between lives, epochs and eras, and its knitting together of the planet’s places. Like Barbara Kingsolver’s Flight Behaviour, its great subjects are deep time, swift change, and the eeriness of everyday life. Reading Clade leaves us, in Timothy Morton’s phrase, “strange strangers” to ourselves; and makes the Earth seem an odder, older, more vulnerable home.”

“Read our Librarian’s top climate change fiction picks by heading to our Fiction section”