Hope in Hell Book Cover

 

The message in this book is one of hope. Porritt, and many other experts believe that this decade will be crucial if we are to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels. Porritt argues that there is reason to be hopeful because we already have the knowledge and solutions required to address climate change in ways that could halve global emissions by 2030.

The first part of Hope in Hell summarises the science behind the state we are in, who is responsible, and what the consequences might be if we do not act now. The second part explores the knowledge and technology already available to us that we could use to mitigate these consequences. The big solution Porritt proposes is a massive ramping up of the renewables sector.

In this book Porritt authoritatively summarises our current perilous state and suggests how it must be addressed right now, through technical solutions and political activism. He says, “I’ve come to the conclusion that we have no choice: without mass civil disobedience, at this very late stage, I cannot see any other way of avoiding that threat of runaway climate change.”

Losing Earth Book Cover

 

“Nearly everything we understand about global warming was understood in 1979,” writes novelist Nathaniel Rich. His masterful analysis of how the oil industry has known for decades about the existential danger created by its core product, and actively buried its findings, makes for sombre but necessary reading. Based on an article the novelist wrote for the New York Times, it lays bare the hypocrisy of industry-funded scientists and the opportunism of a political system which puts profit before human life.  



Everybody Needs Beauty book cover

 

Everybody is talking about the healing properties of nature. Hospitals are being retrofitted with gardens, and forests reimagined as wellbeing centres. On the Shetland Islands, it is possible to walk into a doctor’s surgery with anxiety or depression, and walk out with a prescription for nature.

Where has this come from, and what does ‘going to nature’ mean? Where is it – at the end of a garden, beyond the tarmac fringes of a city, at the summit of a mountain? Drawing on history, science, literature and art, Samantha Walton shows that the nature cure has deep roots – but, as we face an unprecedented crisis of mental health, social injustice and environmental devastation, the search for it is more urgent now than ever.

Everybody Needs Beauty engages seriously with the connection between nature and health, while scrutinising the harmful trends of a wellness industry that seeks to exploit our relationship with the natural world. In doing so, this book explores how the nature cure might lead us towards a more just and radical way of life: a real means of recovery, for people, society and nature.



Brilliant Abyss Book Cover

 

The deep sea is the last, vast wilderness on the planet. For centuries, myth-makers and storytellers have concocted imaginary monsters of the deep, now scientists are looking there to find bizarre, unknown species, chemicals to make new medicines, and to gain a greater understanding of how this world works.

The Brilliant Abyss tells the story of our relationship with the deep sea – how we imagine, explore and exploit it. It captures the golden age of discovery we are currently in and looks back at the history of how we got here, while also looking forward to the unfolding new environmental disasters that are taking place miles beneath the waves, far beyond the public gaze.

Readers are taken on a chronological journey through humanity’s developing relationship with the deep sea. The Brilliant Abyss ends by looking forwards to humanity’s advancing impacts on the deep, including mining and pollution and what we can do about them.

 

Ice River Book Cover

 

The story of one woman’s passion for glaciers. High up in the Alps, Andes and Himalaya, the glaciers are retreating. In Antarctica, thinning ice sheets are releasing meltwater into sensitive food webs, perhaps unlocking huge quantities of methane stored beneath them. The potential consequences for humanity are catastrophic.

Professor Jemma Wadham, one of the world’s leading glaciologists, guides us around the globe and the importance of ice to ecosystems and human life becomes clear. This is a memoir like no other: an eyewitness account from the frontline of the climate crisis and a love letter to glaciers.

Ice Rivers is a remarkable book. For those of us who have had the privilege of scrambling across glaciers around the world, this work will bring back sharp memories of their otherworldly beauty. For those who haven’t, this is the perfect introduction into a crucial and vanishing part of our planet. Jemma Wadham works to understand, to bear witness, and to protect – it’s hard to imagine a more fully human undertaking.’ – Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature.



Wild Fell book cover

 

Lee Schofield, ecologist and site manager for RSPB Haweswater, is leading efforts to breathe life back into two hill farms and their thirty square kilometres of sprawling upland habitat. Informed by the land, its history and the people who have shaped it, Lee and his team are repairing damaged wetlands, meadows and woods. Each year, the landscape is becoming richer, wilder and better able to withstand the shocks of a changing climate.

But in the contested landscape of the Lake District, change is not always welcomed, and success relies on finding a balance between rewilding and respecting cherished farming traditions.

‘In a country defined as the seventh most nature depleted on Earth, in a region plagued by flooding and climate-chaos, here comes Lee Schofield’s brilliant book full of positive action and hope for the future. Wild Fell is a record of environmental achievement, of the RSPB’s mission to restore the places and wild nature of Haweswater. But it’s also a political tract, and throws down a gauntlet to us all to make the Lake District a national park that is genuinely worthy of the title.’ – Mark Cocker

 

Living Together in a Fractured World - book cover

 

Mim Skinner sets out to explore communities that have rejected individualism and nuclear family life in order to embrace a more collective way of living. As she meets those who have had the courage to imagine a better world and start living it – in countercultural hippy communes, the disability led L’Arche communities, queer safe spaces, environmental campaign groups, rehab support networks and more – she asks how each is tackling the social issues of our time and finding greener and more connected ways to be together.



Toxic Free Cover photo

 

Practical everyday tips and ideas to help make ourselves and our planet a little less toxic. There is an invisible world of chemical pollutants – in the soil, the air, our water systems and our own bodies. In this book, environmental journalist Anna Turns makes this invisible world visible, looking at the wider issue of toxic chemicals – what they are, where they’re hidden and the extent of their environmental impact. Go Toxic Free reveals the harmful substances that lurk inside your home, and shares essential swaps and tips to avoid them wherever you can.

Moving Mountains Anthology Cover photo

 

A groundbreaking anthology of nature writing by authors living with chronic illness and physical disability. Moving Mountains is not about overcoming or conquering, but about living with and connecting, shifting the reader’s attention to the things easily overlooked by those who move through the world untroubled by the body that carries them.

Contributors: Isobel Anderson, Kerri Andrews, Polly Atkin, Khairani Barokka, Victoria Bennett, Feline Charpentier, Cat Chong, Eli Clare, Dawn Cole, Lorna Crabbe, Kate Davis, Carol Donaldson, Alec Finlay, Jamie Hale, Jane Hartshorn, Hannah Hodgson, Sally Huband, Rowan Jaines, Dillon Jaxx, Louise Kenward, Abi Palmer, Louisa Adjoa Parker, Alice Tarbuck, Nic Wilson.