Tag Archive for: Arctic

 

The story of a young Sami girl’s coming-of-age, and a powerful fable about family, identity and justice.

Nine-year-old Elsa lives just north of the Arctic Circle. She and her family are Sami – Scandinavia’s indigenous people – and make their living herding reindeer.

One morning when Elsa goes skiing alone, she witnesses a man brutally killing her reindeer calf, Nastegallu. Elsa recognises the man but refuses to tell anyone – least of all the Swedish police force – about what she saw. Instead, she carries her secret as a dark weight on her heart.

Elsa comes of age fighting two wars: one within her community, where male elders expect young women to know their place; and against the ever-escalating wave of prejudice and violence against the Sami.

When Elsa finds herself the target of the man who killed her reindeer calf all those years ago, something inside of her finally breaks. The guilt, fear, and anger she’s been carrying since childhood come crashing over her like an avalanche, and will lead Elsa to a final catastrophic confrontation.

Hannah Gold - The Last Bear

April and her father are living on Bear Island in the Arctic, where there aren’t any polar bears left. At least that’s what April thinks. Until one night she spots something that looks distinctly like a lonely polar bear. This touching story won several awards upon its publication, including the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize 2022. It’s an encouraging and heart-warming read, perfect for readers aged eight to twelve.

 

Read our Librarian’s top climate choices for children here.

“In the Arctic, the land begins to dream itself. Barry Lopez gives us the moonlit madness and the extreme strangeness and the absolute clarity of the world there,” writes Jay Griffiths of Lopez’ National Book Award-winning classic study of the Far North. Lopez’ profound poetic exploration of the Arctic and the stories it holds – considered to be his masterpiece – uncovers the intimate relationship between the Arctic and its myriad human and non-human inhabitants.

 

Read more of our Climate Classics: timeless works exploring themes of climate change and biodiversity loss.

The Arctic treeline is the frontline of climate change, where the trees have been creeping towards the pole for fifty years. These vast swathes of forests, which encircle the north of the globe in an almost unbroken green ring, comprise the world’s second largest biome.

Scientists are only just beginning to understand the astonishing significance of these northern forests for all life on Earth. Six tree species – Scots pine, birch, larch, spruce, poplar and rowan – form the central protagonists of Ben Rawlence’s story. In Scotland, northern Scandinavia, Siberia, Alaska, Canada and Greenland, he discovers what these trees and the people who live and work alongside them have to tell us about the past, present and future of our planet.

At the treeline, Rawlence witnesses the accelerating impact of climate change and the devastating legacies of colonialism and capitalism. But he also finds reasons for hope. Humans are creatures of the forest; we have always evolved with trees. The Treeline asks us where our co-evolution might take us next. Deeply researched and beautifully written, The Treeline is a blend of nature, travel and science writing, underpinned by an urgent environmental message.

It’s tomorrow and the Arctic summer sea ice has completely melted. The long-sought sea route between Asia and Europe is finally open – and while nations strategise for control, private corporate powers are already taking it. The new Arctic has no protection – and business has no scruples.

This is the story of Sean Cawson, an ambitious and wounded man, who reunites with his oldest friend, conservationist Tom Harding, to fuse their goals. One wants to own the Arctic, the other, to save it. Bonded in the past through their love of this unique place, and their fascination with polar heroes, they are going to embody a new way to profit from doing good. When Tom is killed in the accident that Sean survives, although their venture goes on to thrive, Sean’s inner world starts to crumble like the glacier that killed his friend. Three years later when Tom’s body is found and a date for the inquest is set, he knows this is not closure. A story of friendship and betrayal, greed and love, The Ice weaves archival material from centuries past, with the latest research on developments in the Arctic Ocean.

 

Read more of our Climate Classics: timeless works exploring themes of climate change and biodiversity loss.