Tag Archive for: rewilding

 

Rebugging the Planet shows us how bugs are beautiful, inventive and economically invaluable. Responsible for pollinating plants, feeding birds, defending crops and cleaning water systems. With 40% of insect species at risk of extinction and a third more endangered, our planet is heading towards an insect apocalypse. She suggests we have to start giving worms, spiders, beetles, ladybirds and butterflies the space they need to flourish.

Rebugging the Planet is a manual written with infectious joy presenting practical bug-friendly suggestions for gardening and farming. It shows how small changes can have a big impact on our littlest allies.

The Royal Entomological Society write that Rebugging the Planet, “is a manifesto for a green revolution aimed at the layman, a tool kit to enable individuals to make changes to the way that they live, and offers advice on how to put pressure on various layers of society, from friends and neighbours to local politicians and national government, in order to bring about a greener, more diverse world.”

 

This hopeful book celebrates what happens when we step aside and let nature repair the damage. Whether it is the overfishing of bluefin tuna across the Atlantic, the destruction of coral gardens by dredgers in Lyme Bay or the restoration of oysters on the East Coast of America, Charles Clover chronicles how determined individuals are proving that the crisis in our oceans can be reversed, with benefits for both local communities and entire ecosystems.

Trawling and dredging create more CO2 than the aviation industry, damaging vast areas of our continental shelves and preventing them them from soaking up carbon. Glover explains how we need to fish in different ways, if we fish at all. Rewilding the Sea gives us a positive vision of how we can mitigate climate change and restore the biodiversity in our oceans.

“I recommend anyone prone to despair to read Wilding – for Isabella Tree’s apparently quixotic tale of Exmoor ponies, longhorn cattle, red deer and Tamworth pigs roaming free on an aristocratic estate is a hugely important addition to the literature of what can be done to restore soil and soul. The book describes an attempt to renew the ecosystem, after decades of intensive agriculture of some 1,400 hectares owned by Tree’s husband Charlie Burrell at Knepp in West Sussex. The project, which began in 2001, is perhaps unique in England, and the results have been spectacular. Tree is a trenchant critic of the intensive agriculture that has led to soil degradation and erosion. She questions the goal-driven frameworks of much conservation work: when there is no preferred end state, formerly rare and even vanished species tend suddenly to reappear. And she battles heroically against the English addiction to tidiness. For a nation obsessed with orderliness and boundaries, land that is endlessly morphing, on its way to being something else, can be discomforting. She also makes the case that it is possible to feed 10 billion humans on this planet while also leaving more space for the wild.” – Caspar Henderson

“Sparked by the sudden death of his teenage daughter Iris, Goldsmith’s memoir of grief, loss and regeneration is a celebration not just of her life, but of the living world and all its inhabitants. Wise and beautifully written, it’s an inspiration to anyone with access to a patch of land, however small. And a reminder to anyone who has lost a loved one that the best way to honour their memory is to cherish the planet.” – Liz Jensen