Tag Archive for: climate change

Parable of the Sower

 

America is a place of chaos, where violence rules and only the rich and powerful are safe. Lauren Olamina, a young woman with the extraordinary power to feel the pain of others as her own, records everything she sees of this broken world in her journal. Then, one terrible night, everything alters beyond recognition, and Lauren must make her voice heard for the sake of those she loves. Soon, her vision becomes reality and her dreams of a better way to live gain the power to change humanity forever. This seminal cli-fi novel addresses climate change, social injustice, and corporate greed in a world that has, in the years since its publication, moved beyond fiction to reality.

Losing Earth Book Cover

 

“Nearly everything we understand about global warming was understood in 1979,” writes novelist Nathaniel Rich. His masterful analysis of how the oil industry has known for decades about the existential danger created by its core product, and actively buried its findings, makes for sombre but necessary reading. Based on an article the novelist wrote for the New York Times, it lays bare the hypocrisy of industry-funded scientists and the opportunism of a political system which puts profit before human life.  



Ice River Book Cover

 

The story of one woman’s passion for glaciers. High up in the Alps, Andes and Himalaya, the glaciers are retreating. In Antarctica, thinning ice sheets are releasing meltwater into sensitive food webs, perhaps unlocking huge quantities of methane stored beneath them. The potential consequences for humanity are catastrophic.

Professor Jemma Wadham, one of the world’s leading glaciologists, guides us around the globe and the importance of ice to ecosystems and human life becomes clear. This is a memoir like no other: an eyewitness account from the frontline of the climate crisis and a love letter to glaciers.

Ice Rivers is a remarkable book. For those of us who have had the privilege of scrambling across glaciers around the world, this work will bring back sharp memories of their otherworldly beauty. For those who haven’t, this is the perfect introduction into a crucial and vanishing part of our planet. Jemma Wadham works to understand, to bear witness, and to protect – it’s hard to imagine a more fully human undertaking.’ – Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature.



 

‘There is a fish on the sand; I see it clearly. But it is not on its side, lying still. It is partly upright. It moves. I can see its gills, off the ground and wide open. It looks as though it’s standing up.’

A few decades into the twenty-first century, in their permanently flooded garden in Cornwall, Cathy and her wife Ephie give up on their vegetable patch and plant a paddy field instead. Thousands of miles away, expat Margaret is struggling to adjust to life in Kuala Lumpur, now a coastal city. In New Zealand, two teenagers marvel at the extreme storms hitting their island.

But they are not the only ones adapting to the changing climate. The starfish on Cathy’s kitchen window are just the start. As all manner of sea creatures begin to leave the oceans and invade the land, the new normal becomes increasingly hard to accept.

Mark Lynas’ 2008 book Six Degrees soon became a must-read for anyone concerned about the speed and severity of global heating. In its 2020 incarnation, updated to reflect the most recent scientific research and projections, Lynas’ analysis of how the world will change with each degree of warming pulls no punches about what’s at stake. But in leaving space for optimism and hope, the evidence he sets out becomes a powerful call to action as well as a timely and terrifying warning.

 

This book is an inspiring manifesto from Global Optimism Co-Founders, Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac. It begins by painting two futuristic scenarios: the first is the path we are on if we don’t put an urgent end to fossil fuels, and the second scenario is the future we could have.

Practical, optimistic and empowering, this book shows us a world we can all be a part of creating. This is the most important decade we have ever faced, and The Future We Choose shows how we can move beyond the climate crisis into a thriving future.

 

Eco Rangers - Candice Lemon-Scott

Young readers who love mysteries and the environment will love the action-packed story of Ebony and Jay, best friends who love to rescue wildlife. After a devastating wildfire in the bushland, Ebony and Jay are doing their best to find and rescue injured animals. Readers will help Ebony and Jay search for clues and nurse a possum back to health.

 

Read our Librarian’s top climate choices for children here.

How to Bee - Bren MacDibble

Nine-year-old Peony wants to be a bee – but all the bees in Australia have died, and children like her have to pollinate the fruit trees with feather wands. It’s a great introduction to dystopian fiction for readers aged eight to twelve.

 

Read our Librarian’s top climate choices for children here.

The Lonely Polar Bear - Khoa Le

A polar bear cub finds himself alone on an iceberg after a terrible storm. Without his mother, he befriends puffins, whales, and a mysterious little girl. Vietnamese artist Khoa Le has illustrated a beautiful and whimsical story that subtly introduces young readers to the impact of climate change.

 

Suitable for Children Age 6-12

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs - Judi Barrett

If quirky, unusual metaphors captivate your child, Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs is a perfect introduction to the climate crisis and consumption culture. The fantasy fiction book — with unforgettable illustrations — was published in 1978. It tackles extreme weather events, and what humans can do about them, with surreal humour. Read it to your pre-school children.

 

Read our Librarian’s top climate choices for children here.