Tag Archive for: Climate Action

Hope in Hell Book Cover

 

The message in this book is one of hope. Porritt, and many other experts believe that this decade will be crucial if we are to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels. Porritt argues that there is reason to be hopeful because we already have the knowledge and solutions required to address climate change in ways that could halve global emissions by 2030.

The first part of Hope in Hell summarises the science behind the state we are in, who is responsible, and what the consequences might be if we do not act now. The second part explores the knowledge and technology already available to us that we could use to mitigate these consequences. The big solution Porritt proposes is a massive ramping up of the renewables sector.

In this book Porritt authoritatively summarises our current perilous state and suggests how it must be addressed right now, through technical solutions and political activism. He says, “I’ve come to the conclusion that we have no choice: without mass civil disobedience, at this very late stage, I cannot see any other way of avoiding that threat of runaway climate change.”

 

This positive book contains everything children need to become guardians of the planet. Children can learn how to become keepers of the coasts, friends of the forests, home heroes and much more through a mix of compelling facts, creative activities and proactive tips.

Key environmental topics are clearly explained, and the easy-to-follow projects and suggestions help to put the issues in an everyday context. From reusing clothes and composting food to reducing water waste and giving wildlife a helping hand, this book will encourage children to engage with environmental problems and inspire them to take care of our planet.

Suitable for Children aged 8 to 11.

 

Not Too Late brings together climate voices from around the world to address the political, scientific, social, and emotional dimensions of the most urgent issue human beings have ever faced. Accessible, encouraging, and engaging, it’s an invitation to everyone to understand the issue more deeply, participate more boldly, and imagine the future more creatively.

“Hope, like love, means taking risks and being vulnerable to the effects of loss. It means recognizing the uncertainty of the future and making a commitment to try to participate in shaping it.”

In this concise collection of essays and interviews, Not Too Late features the voices of Indigenous activists, such as Guam-based attorney and writer Julian Aguon; climate scientists, among them Jacquelyn Gill and Edward Carr; artists, such as Marshall Islands poet and activist Kathy Jeñtil-Kijiner; and longtime organisers, including The Tyranny of Oil author Antonia Juhasz and Emergent Strategy author adrienne maree brown. An energising case for hope about the climate along with a chorus of voices calling on us to rise to the present moment.

The environmental crisis is deeply entangled with colonialism and a capitalist system that places profit over people. Tackling the climate crisis cannot be achieved without an unfiltered examination of exploitation, inequality, poverty and racism.

Named as one of the most influencial women in the UK climate movement, Mikaela Loach offers a fresh perspective on the crisis through the lens of climate justice which creates the real possibility of huge leaps towards racial equality and collective liberation as it aims to dismantle the very foundations of these issues. ‘False hope won’t save us,’ Loach tells us. ‘But active hope can.’ This book is a must read for every climate activist.

 

This book is an inspiring manifesto from Global Optimism Co-Founders, Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac. It begins by painting two futuristic scenarios: the first is the path we are on if we don’t put an urgent end to fossil fuels, and the second scenario is the future we could have.

Practical, optimistic and empowering, this book shows us a world we can all be a part of creating. This is the most important decade we have ever faced, and The Future We Choose shows how we can move beyond the climate crisis into a thriving future.