Tag Archive for: Cli-Fi

Parable of the Sower

 

America is a place of chaos, where violence rules and only the rich and powerful are safe. Lauren Olamina, a young woman with the extraordinary power to feel the pain of others as her own, records everything she sees of this broken world in her journal. Then, one terrible night, everything alters beyond recognition, and Lauren must make her voice heard for the sake of those she loves. Soon, her vision becomes reality and her dreams of a better way to live gain the power to change humanity forever. This seminal cli-fi novel addresses climate change, social injustice, and corporate greed in a world that has, in the years since its publication, moved beyond fiction to reality.

The New Atlantis

 

You can’t go wrong with anything by Le Guin, but this novella is a remarkably prescient prediction of the climactic and geological upheaval wrought by a warming world. Set in the near-future in an America paralysed by corporate control of government, global warming is causing continents to sink, submerging much of the world under water. The people keep the dream alive that a new Atlantis will rise up out of the ocean. Written over forty years ago, this vision of hope sinking and hope rising is closer today than ever and Ursula Le Guin’s grim tale appears prophetic.

Stochasticity

 

Reg Stratton is a bouncer eking a life out in the decaying wilds just outside a dystopian post-oil Detroit – a city in collapse. But when he gets sucked into making a little money on the side by tasking out his time via an anonymous app, he finds himself tangled up with ecoterrorists who have a creative and fast-moving plan. Reg ends up in the middle of a riot that could change his life, the city, maybe even the world… as long as he keeps cool and makes the right choice. It’s a fun adventure that takes an unexpectedly hopeful turn.

This novella was originally a part of the award nominated Metatropolis series, edited by John Scalzi and Jay Lake.

 

In this searing indictment — that’s also an empowering call to action — award-winning novelist and essayist Amitav Ghosh analyzes modern culture, history and politics to show how popular narratives have failed to wrestle with the reality of our collective climate crisis. The breadth of research is astounding but so too is Ghosh’s ability to diagnose the grave inadequacies of modern culture and offer some pathways forward. A book I return to again and again, The Great Derangement is haunting and harrowing, as Ghosh tells us some hard truths. But it’s also an inspiring challenge to writers, urging us to find new ways to tell the most important story on earth. — Melissa Jean Gismondi

 

Eleanor Oliphant meets Killing Eve in this funny and gloriously unhinged New Zealand sensation, longlisted for the Dublin Literary Award 2023. The climate is in crisis and wealthy immigrants are flocking to New Zealand for shelter, stealing land and taking over. A darkly comic novel about a slacker called Alice who is drawn into action of the most radical – and dangerous – kind. Bold and brilliantly bizarre, She’s a Killer is a satirical dystopian cli-fi thriller.

 

An exciting, fast-paced thriller with an ecological message as two teens fight to save the planet, this cli-fi modern classic explores the themes of labour, pollution, technology, and relationships. There’s a romantic heart beating at the centre of this award-winning novel – and an environmentalist core that will stir the imagination.

Read our Librarian’s top climate choices for Young Adults here

The Swan Book is set in the future, with Aboriginal people still living under the Intervention in the north, in an environment fundamentally altered by climate change.

It follows the life of a mute teenager called Oblivia, the victim of gang-rape by petrol-sniffing youths, from the displaced community where she lives in a hulk, in a swamp filled with rusting boats, and thousands of black swans driven from other parts of the country, to her marriage to Warren Finch, the first Aboriginal president of Australia, and her elevation to the position of First Lady, confined to a tower in a flooded and lawless southern city. The Swan Book has all the qualities which made Wright’s previous novel, Carpentaria, a prize-winning bestseller.

It offers an intimate awareness of the realities facing Aboriginal people; the wild energy and humour in her writing finds hope in the bleakest situations; and the remarkable combination of storytelling elements, drawn from myth and legend and fairy tale, has Oblivia Ethylene in the company of amazing characters like Aunty Bella Donna of the Champions, the Harbour Master, Big Red and the Mechanic, a talking monkey called Rigoletto, three genies with doctorates, and throughout, the guiding presence of swans.

 

Read our Librarian’s top climate change fiction picks by heading to our Fiction section

Run away, one drowsy summer’s afternoon, with Holly Sykes: wayward teenager, broken-hearted rebel and unwitting pawn in a titanic, hidden conflict. Over six decades, the consequences of a moment’s impulse unfold, drawing an ordinary woman into a world far beyond her imagining. And as life in the near future turns perilous, the pledge she made to a stranger may become the key to her family’s survival…

 

Read our Librarian’s top climate change fiction picks by heading to our Fiction section

Decades from now, an artificial black hole has fallen into the Earth’s core. As scientists frantically work to prevent the ultimate disaster, they discover that the entire planet could be destroyed within a year.

But while they look for an answer, some claim that the only way to save Earth is to let its human inhabitants become extinct: to reset the evolutionary clock and start over.

‘This book is not just a green globe-trotting adventure; it is also a thoughtful mix of warnings and promise.” – The Guardian

 

Read our Librarian’s top climate change fiction picks by heading to our Fiction section

It’s January 1st, 2015, and the UK is the first nation to introduce carbon dioxide rationing, in a drastic bid to combat climate change. As her family spirals out of control, Laura Brown chronicles the first year of rationing with scathing abandon. Will her mother become one with her inner wolf? Will her sister give up her weekends in Ibiza? Does her father love the pig more than her? Can her band The Dirty Angels make it big? And will Ravi Datta ever notice her?

In these dark days, Laura deals with the issues that really matter: love, floods and pigs.

The Carbon Diaries 2015 is one girl’s drastic bid to stay sane in a world unravelling at the seams.

 

Read our Librarian’s top climate change fiction picks by heading to our Fiction section