The environmental crisis is deeply entangled with colonialism and a capitalist system that places profit over people. Tackling the climate crisis cannot be achieved without an unfiltered examination of exploitation, inequality, poverty and racism.

Named as one of the most influencial women in the UK climate movement, Mikaela Loach offers a fresh perspective on the crisis through the lens of climate justice which creates the real possibility of huge leaps towards racial equality and collective liberation as it aims to dismantle the very foundations of these issues. ‘False hope won’t save us,’ Loach tells us. ‘But active hope can.’ This book is a must read for every climate activist.

‘Once upon a time, words began to vanish from the language of children. They dissappeared so quietly that at first almost no-one noticed – until one day, they were gone.’

This book began as a response to the removal of everyday nature words – among them acorn, bluebell, kingfisher and wren – from a widely used children’s dictionary, because those words were not being used enough by children to merit inclusion. Robert Macfarlane and Jackie Morris set upon a mission to bring back these lost words. This gorgeously illustrated ‘book of spells’ seeks to conjure back the near-lost magic and strangeness of the nature that surrounds us. Adults will love this book as much as children.

 

A dark and witty story of environmental collapse and runaway capitalism. In a near future in which tens of thousands of species are going extinct every year, a whole industry has sprung up around their extinctions, including biobanks housing DNA samples from which lost organisms might someday be resurrected. But then, one day, it’s all gone. A mysterious cyber-attack hits every biobank simultaneously, wiping out the last traces of the perished species.

Animal cognition scientist Karin Resaint is consumed with existential grief over what humans have done to nature, while extinction industry executive Mark Halyard comes from the dark side. But they are both concerned with one species in particular: the venomous lumpsucker, a small, ugly bottom-feeder that happens to be the most intelligent fish on the planet. The further they go in their hunt for the lumpsucker, the deeper they are drawn into the mystery of the attack on the biobanks.Who was really behind it? And why would anyone do such a thing? Virtuosic and profound, witty and despairing, Venomous Lumpsucker is Ned Beauman at his very best.

Mark Lynas’ 2008 book Six Degrees soon became a must-read for anyone concerned about the speed and severity of global heating. In its 2020 incarnation, updated to reflect the most recent scientific research and projections, Lynas’ analysis of how the world will change with each degree of warming pulls no punches about what’s at stake. But in leaving space for optimism and hope, the evidence he sets out becomes a powerful call to action as well as a timely and terrifying warning.

 

The creatures of the world’s oceans have had enough of being mistreated by humankind – and they’re taking violent revenge: within days, the whole globe is under attack from whales, toxic jellyfish and exploding lobsters. Is some unknown force coordinating their revolution, and if so, can a Norwegian marine biologist and his colleagues save the day? Gripping stuff, full of plausible extrapolations from real science. – Liz Jensen

This debut from a young researcher, writer and award-winning activist begins with a harrowing account of the suicide attempt which left him a double amputee, and morphs into an uplifting road-map to a positive, liveable future. The climate and ecological despair that led Herzog to the brink of death is becoming endemic in his generation, yet remains relatively unexamined. Which makes his meticulously researched, deeply moving and sublimely-written account essential reading for anyone struggling with climate grief or working with those who do. This empowering and uplifting book may start by making you cry, but it will end by making you think. And it may even change you. – Liz Jensen.

 

First published in 1939, Steinbeck’s powerful tale of  greed, corruption and the consequences of intensive farming is a stark reminder that man-made environmental disasters are far from new. The story tells how the beleaguered Joad family, forced to join the great wave of migrants leaving the poverty of Oklahoma’s ruined Dust Bowl, travels in search of the green orchards of California, with its “golden oranges hanging from the trees”. But there’s trouble in paradise…

 

This book is an inspiring manifesto from Global Optimism Co-Founders, Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac. It begins by painting two futuristic scenarios: the first is the path we are on if we don’t put an urgent end to fossil fuels, and the second scenario is the future we could have.

Practical, optimistic and empowering, this book shows us a world we can all be a part of creating. This is the most important decade we have ever faced, and The Future We Choose shows how we can move beyond the climate crisis into a thriving future.

 

Rebecca Solnit - Hope int he Dark
At a time when political, environmental and social gloom can seem overpowering, this remarkable book offers a lucid, affirmative and well-argued case for hope. This exquisite work traces a history of activism and social change over the past five decades – from the fall of the Berlin Wall to the worldwide marches against the war in Iraq.

Hope in the Dark is a paean to optimism in the uncertainty of the 21st century. Tracing the footsteps of the last century’s thinkers – including Woolf, Gandhi, Borges, Benjamin and Havel – Solnit conjures a timeless vision of cause and effect that will light our way through the dark and lead us to profound and effective political engagement.